Popular links of the month – LinkedIn writers’ groups, obtaining copyright permission, and bad literary agents

I don’t know whether my most-retweeted links reflect my eclectic reading habits or my Tweeps’ diverse interests, but the list below is definitely a May miscellany. For anyone new to my blog, a warm welcome, and a quick explanation that at the end of each month I post a summary of links I’ve tweeted that have proven popular.

In no particular order, they are:

The 20 Essential LinkedIn Groups for Aspiring Writers.  Personally I find LinkedIn both hit (I scored a great contract job) and miss (somebody edit those Group comments!), but there are a few nuggets amongst the dross.

Happily, my guide for authors on obtaining permission to use song lyrics or other copyright material in a book has proven popular.

Wise words for memoir writers from author Ellen Cassedy: Ten tips to ensure readers will care about your family story. I won a copy of Ellen’s book We Are Here when I commented on this very post on the SheWrites community for, you guessed it, women writers. Bonus!

This letter to an “ungrateful writer” was written by the world’s most ungracious publisher.

Confused about what “creative nonfiction” actually is? Here’s a cartoon that explains everything you need to know about the genre.

How to spot A Bad Literary Agent. See how I buried it in my list? (joke)

If you’re worried about word count for your chapter or your book or your memoir or your novel, as many who visit this site seem to be, read Daniel Torday’s tips and reminders here.

And for something similar but different, here’s a fascinating read about an experience most likely to be most unlike your own: A personal story about Indigenous literacy from the Program Manager of the Indigenous Literacy Foundation. (Disclosure: I am happy to call the ILF a client.)

Happy linking. If there’s anything you’d like me to write or tweet more about, please let me know in the comments. I receive plenty of feedback via email about this blog, but few comments. One more 21st-century dilemma, I suppose.

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