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How I work with my published authors: Q&A with Brad Hutchins

How do I work with the writers I choose to represent?
I’ve heard from a few Australian writers recently who wanted to know a bit more about how I work with the authors I represent. In response I thought it might be useful to hear from one of my freshly published authors, Brad Hutchins, whose GAME SET CASH has just been released in Australia and online.

The author took a gamble
When Brad queried me, the manuscript was a long way from ready to show a publisher, though he had approached publishers through the slush pile of unsolicited submissions, and had been rejected. As you’ll see in the Q&A below, by the time he approached me, Brad knew he needed editorial development but wanted to see if a publishing professional thought his book might interest a publisher. So it was a bit back-to-front and not what I recommend, but the publishing path is never straight.

This was a gamble, because:

  • if a writer has already approached and been rejected by publishers, it can be impossible to go back to them; and
  • most agents will only consider completed manuscripts at a high degree of polish.

But then, gambling is largely what GAME SET CASH is all about.

The agent took a gamble
Agreeing to represent an author is also a gamble. Well, let’s call it a calculated risk. The agent’s work is speculative – all the editorial/pitching work up front to pay off (relatively speaking) with commission from the author’s advance and (hopefully) subsequent royalty and foreign rights income.

So why did I choose to work with Brad?

  • lads’ stories from young Australian men are in high demand but short supply
  • it was a memoir incorporating an unusual angle – tennis trading/betting – as well as the combination of sport and travel
  • crucially, Brad knew he needed to do more work, and was prepared to do it.

My willingness to mentor Brad through further editorial development makes me either a romantic or a fool, depending on who you ask. Admittedly it’s sometimes a poor decision from a profitability point of view, which is why I have to be so selective. (And which is why I do writing and editing work for companies and other authors who are not my agency clients.) But the satisfaction of helping a unique Australian story take its final shape, and then finding that manuscript a home with a publisher, is enormous.

Agent’s Q&A with Brad Hutchins

Why did you want to write GAME, SET, CASH! ?

I’ve always loved reading and writing. I’d been writing fiction as a hobby for a few years before I realised non-fiction had a much better chance of being published. When I finished court-siding on the tennis tour, life suddenly became a whole lot quieter and I needed a passion project to sink my teeth into. It hit me that I had lived a story many people found intriguing and seemed very interested in. So I started looking for an agent.

Besides that, there is a lot of confusion and misconception from the general public in regards to court-siding. So it is nice to be able to set the record straight and share the fun of the road with people while dispelling any sinister myths surrounding the practice.

How long did it take you to write it?

Because it was all there in my head I managed to punch the first draft out in less than three months. Editing then took another six months, working with both you and the publishers.

When you approached me, did you think your manuscript was finished? 

Negative. I’d barely started because I knew I’d need guidance toward a winning formula and I didn’t want to invest too much time in what could likely be the wrong direction.

[Editor’s note: this is not entirely true. I read a complete manuscript, but it was a rather rough draft. Which would be why Australian publishers did not take any interest in it as an unsolicited submission. See quote in bold below, and my post on unsolicited submissions.]

How did I help you to strengthen your manuscript?

You gave me an idea of how to shape the whole book and helped me solidify ideas to focus on for each chapter. Once I’d written my draft you then gave it a thorough cut and polish. Cutting out all those lame clichés, adverbs and unnecessary bits made the manuscript much more concise and engaging.

You were very frank and non-judgmental with your feedback and helped me realise the general public might not be as interested in certain sections I’d written. I agree with your approach of editing before heading to publishers because it makes their job easier and gives us a better chance of getting the tick of approval.

What surprised you about the process of finding an agent, a publisher, and the process of getting a book published?

I had no expectations as the whole process was new. I think most people are unacquainted with the publishing industry and are a little daunted by the task. I knew it wouldn’t be a quick or easy goal to achieve but I figured I’d only find out if I had a real crack at it.

Do you have any advice for unpublished writers?

Don’t be afraid to put yourself out there. I was knocked back a number of times by other agents and publishers. From the outset I wanted to be realistic so I expected that to happen. However, I stayed optimistic regardless and in the end it all paid off.

How does it feel to see your book in bookstores and online?

It’s a trip! It’s very fulfilling and exciting. You may want to edit this cliché, but it is a bit of a life-long dream come true! I’m incredibly stoked and want to thank everyone who helped make it a reality.

What else would you like to know?
Okay, keep your questions coming because they help me understand what you’d like to know more about. I plan to do more of these Q&A-style posts if readers like them. So I need to know if this one’s helpful!

Brad Hutchins with his new book.

 

{ 2 comments… add one }

  • Susannah Birch

    Thank you, I found this post very helpful with an idea of what I can expect. I think I feel a bit like Brad – rather go in with something not perfectly polished, so I can get some direction before I waste hours on something that may end up cut out anyway!

    • Thanks Susannah. The more time goes on, the greater my sense that there are great nonfiction stories out there in rough draft, but their authors have either been knocked back by an electronic submissions-sifter at one of the big publishing houses, or by a professional reader looking for something polished and finalised to show an acquiring editor/publisher — because they sent it off too soon and without any informed guidance. Admittedly I pick and choose projects carefully, based on the commercial realities of the business and my own reading preferences. But I’d rather hear from people who know they need some help rather than someone who feels their work is finished when it’s not. –Virginia

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